Tradeshow and Exhibit Thoughtleaders
"The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge
and the dissemination of truth."

John F. Kennedy


E. Jane Lorimer's Articles
 

The Value of Competitors at Shows

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When most tradeshow sophisticates hear that a company is participating in a show or event only because their competitors are there, they throw up their hands and painfully
exclaim, "The industry has not changed in 20 years." After years of hearing how wrong it is to be in a show or event just because your competitors are there, we can now
hold our heads up high and say with assurance that we are there for a good reason -- our competitors are there!

So what changed? The answer is threefold:

1. We finally realized that there is value in observing what our competitors do at shows.

2. Competitor activities can be measured and evaluated.

3. And, we recognize that tradeshows are the ultimate breeding ground for information exchanges.

Intelligence experts worldwide say the ripest field for gaining the most competitive intelligence at one place is at a tradeshow. And this intelligence can be fed into the strategic
hopper for further analysis about shifts and moves in the industry as well as what’s going on among the players. Some companies make intelligence gathering a dedicated
activity at shows. They establish a team comprised of internal or external experts, set goals for information categories they want to learn about and prepare an action plan
for gathering and reporting meaningful information. The following is a sample checklist of the types of things you can learn about your competitors at a tradeshow.

Show Floor

What product or service trends did you notice? Are they the same or different from your company’s?

What techniques for demonstrating products/services did you notice? Are they the same or different from your company’s?

Advertising/Media

Other Activities

What competitors were at the show but not exhibiting? What were they doing instead?

Competitor Event Cost Estimates

© 2013 by E.Jane Lorimer